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Grilled sow’s womb for dinner, anyone?

In my upcoming book Obedient unto Death, describing meals eaten 2000 years ago can prove interesting. In a previous blog, I discussed the seating chart at a Roman dinner party—the host assigned places based on the order of your status or popularity.

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A Treacherous Topic part 2

I found no records of general concern to humanize the laws governing slavery. For the most part, the ruling class agreed slaves had no personal rights apart from those granted by their masters. This view is not surprising. Rights were minimal to non-existent for most women, children, and non-Roman citizens who weren't slaves.

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0 Comments5 Minutes

Treacherous Topic part 1

When we attempt to relate to another culture, especially one existing over 2500 years ago, confusion, bewilderment, and in the case of slavery, rage is bound to happen. The culture of slavery is an issue authors encounter when writing about the Roman empire, and it is a treacherous one to address.

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0 Comments4 Minutes

If you eat with your fingers you might be a Roman.

In my murder #mystery novel “Obedient unto Death,” I needed to describe a formal Roman dinner. I have watched movies portraying Roman dinner parties, but watching and writing about them are two entirely different skill sets. What did the ancient Romans living around the Mediterranean eat and drink at dinner parties?

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